Philip Glass Essentials

Philip Glass Essentials

About this playlist

Philip Glass never followed any of the well-trodden paths of music in the mid-20th century. He writes varied pieces, from chamber works to operas, and he calls his most recognisable technique the "additive structure method" – first used in the piece "Two Pages" in 1969. This technique utilises rhythmic cycles, as he describes: "a simple figure can expand and then contract in many different ways, maintaining the same general melodic configuration but, because of the addition of one note, it takes on a very different rhythmic shape."

Tracklist

  • Glassworks: I. Opening

    Philip Glass, Philip Glass Ensemble, Michael Riesman

    6:25

  • String Quartet No. 5: II.

    Kronos Quartet

    2:59

  • String Quartet No. 5: III.

    Kronos Quartet

    5:28

  • Movement IV

    Gidon Kremer, Kremerata Baltica

    7:05

  • Metamorphosis II

    Nicolas Horvath

    7:17

  • Glass
  • The Poet Acts

    Katia Labèque

    3:42

  • Mad Rush

    Jeroen van Veen

    15:12

  • Knee Play 4

    Michael Riesman, Marc Jacoby, Philip Glass, Philip Gavin Smith, Sheryl Sutton, Iris Hiskey, Philip Glass Ensemble, Paul Zukofsky, David Anchel, Sean Barker, Richard Landry, Richard Peck, Jon Gibson

    6:45

  • Glass
  • Train to Sao Paulo

    Philip Glass

    3:04

  • Titles

    Carducci String Quartet

    1:17

  • Satyagraha: Evening Song

    Douglas Perry, Christopher Keene, New York City Opera Orchestra & Chorus

    4:07

  • Glass: Façades

    London Chamber Orchestra, Christopher Warren-Green, John Harle, Simon Haram

    7:49

  • Company: Movement 1

    London Chamber Orchestra

    2:37

  • Etude No. 2

    Lavinia Meijer

    6:58

  • Glass
  • Primacy of Number

    Yo-Yo Ma, Philip Glass Ensemble, Michael Riesman

    6:52

  • Total playing time

    1:27:42

Curated by

Maryna Boiko

Curation Manager

About this playlist

Philip Glass never followed any of the well-trodden paths of music in the mid-20th century. He writes varied pieces, from chamber works to operas, and he calls his most recognisable technique the "additive structure method" – first used in the piece "Two Pages" in 1969. This technique utilises rhythmic cycles, as he describes: "a simple figure can expand and then contract in many different ways, maintaining the same general melodic configuration but, because of the addition of one note, it takes on a very different rhythmic shape."

Curated by

Maryna Boiko

Curation Manager

Done