Pérotin Essentials

Pérotin Essentials

About this playlist

Pérotin was a composer of the late 12th century who worked and taught at the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris. Along with his predecessor, Léonin, Pérotin was a crucial figure in the development of medieval polyphony – ie. music with multiple parts at once. The compositions of his that we know of were all written down in a book at Notre Dame called the "Magnus Liber", or "Great Book", but he shared the book with his teacher and fellow polyphonal innovator Leonin, as well as the composers and teachers who followed, so we don't know for sure which compositions are his and which belong to others.

Tracklist

  • Beata viscera Mariae Virginis

    Cecilia Bartoli, Sistine Chapel Choir, Massimo Palombella

    3:48

  • Sederunt principes

    The Early Music Consort Of London, David Munrow

    11:22

  • Viderunt Omnes

    The Hilliard Ensemble

    11:36

  • Alleluia Nativitas

    Ensemble Providencia

    7:50

  • Mors

    Theatre of Voices, Paul Hillier

    1:37

  • Alleluia Posui Adiutorium

    The Hilliard Ensemble

    7:34

  • Salvatoris Hodie

    Ensemble Gilles Binchois, Dominique Vellard

    12:51

  • Pérotin: Ex semine rosa prodit spina
  • Ex semine rosa prodit spina

    Ensemble Providencia

    2:57

  • Pérotin
  • Dum Sigillum

    The Hilliard Ensemble

    7:37

  • Organum quadruplum

    Elisabeth Verlooy, Jeanne Deroubaix, Rene Letroye, Franz Mertens, Willy Pourtois, Pro Musica Antiqua, Safford Cape

    14:56

  • Perotin and the Ars Antiqua
  • Deus misertus hominis

    The Hilliard Ensemble

    4:59

  • Total playing time

    1:27:10

Curated by

Guy Jones

Head of Curation

About this playlist

Pérotin was a composer of the late 12th century who worked and taught at the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris. Along with his predecessor, Léonin, Pérotin was a crucial figure in the development of medieval polyphony – ie. music with multiple parts at once. The compositions of his that we know of were all written down in a book at Notre Dame called the "Magnus Liber", or "Great Book", but he shared the book with his teacher and fellow polyphonal innovator Leonin, as well as the composers and teachers who followed, so we don't know for sure which compositions are his and which belong to others.

Curated by

Guy Jones

Head of Curation

Done