Mozart: Violin Concerto No. 5, Violin Sonata No. 32 & Adagio

Mozart: Violin Concerto No. 5, Violin Sonata No. 32 & Adagio

Noa Wildschut, Gordan Nikolic, Nederlands Kamer Orkest, Yoram Ish-Hurwitz

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Tracklist

  • Mozart: Violin Concerto No. 5 in A Major K. 219 ,'Turkish': I. Allegro aperto

    Noa Wildschut

    11:15

  • Mozart: Violin Concerto No. 5 in A Major K. 219 ,'Turkish': II. Adagio

    Noa Wildschut

    12:28

  • Mozart: Violin Concerto No. 5 in A Major K. 219 ,'Turkish': III. Rondeau. Tempo di menuetto

    Noa Wildschut

    10:31

  • Mozart: Adagio for Violin and Orchestra in E Major, K. 261

    Noa Wildschut

    9:17

  • Mozart: Violin Sonata No. 32 in B-Flat Major, K. 454: I. Largo - Allegro

    Noa Wildschut, Yoram Ish-Hurwitz

    7:35

  • Mozart: Violin Sonata No. 32 in B-Flat Major, K. 454: II. Andante

    Noa Wildschut, Yoram Ish-Hurwitz

    9:06

  • Mozart: Violin Sonata No. 32 in B-Flat Major, K. 454: III. Allegretto

    Noa Wildschut, Yoram Ish-Hurwitz

    6:59

  • Total playing time

    1:07:14

On this album

Album review

“The push is on to make 16-year-old Dutch violinist Noa Wildschut the prodigy of the moment, and a brief encounter with her 1714 Grancino violin is enough to hear why: it's a strikingly sharp, almost piercing sound that grabs your attention. Wildschut's sound might be more suited to Romantic music, but that's coming, and one can understand why she might have wanted to start with Mozart. Yet one may also feel that Mozart is not quite her métier. Sample the beginning of the Violin Concerto No. 5 in A major, K. 219 ("Turkish"). Plenty of players take a little beat at the violin's entrance, but Wildschut's is unusually large and arguably destroys the integrity of the tempo. Her cadenzas, too, partly of her own invention, are a bit overdone. Then again, she is in touch with the melodic appeal of the music, and the album does make you want to hear more from her. She does well to include the Adagio in E major for violin and orchestra, K. 261, an alternate slow movement for the A major concerto, and in both these slow movements she has an impressively controlled long line. The Violin Sonata in B flat major, K. 454, works less well: the relationship between violin and piano does not quite seem to sync with the moments when Mozart lets the violin step out in new ways. But again, there is that brilliant violin tone. Recommended, partly for the promise shown.”

Album review provided by TiVo. This content is not produced by Primephonic, and any views expressed are the review author’s own.

Record label

Credits

    Released

    2017

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