Respighi: Roman Trilogy

Respighi: Roman Trilogy

Sinfonia of London

  • Image for album

Tracklist

  • I. Circenses

    Sinfonia of London

    4:16

  • II. Giubilio

    Sinfonia of London

    6:30

  • III. L'Ottobrata

    Sinfonia of London

    7:51

  • IV. La Befana

    Sinfonia of London

    5:15

  • I. La fontana di Valle Giulia all'alba

    Sinfonia of London

    4:16

  • II. La fontana del Tritone al mattino

    Sinfonia of London

    2:23

  • III. La fontana di Trevi al meriggio

    Sinfonia of London

    3:03

  • IV. La fontana di Villa Medici al tramonto

    Sinfonia of London

    5:15

  • I. I pini di Villa Borghese

    Sinfonia of London

    2:39

  • II. I pini presso una catacomba

    Sinfonia of London

    6:39

  • III. I pini del Gianicolo

    Sinfonia of London

    6:43

  • IV. I pini della Via Appia

    Sinfonia of London

    5:11

  • Total playing time

    1:00:06

Album review

“Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov had a profound influence on Russian music, but in a way, his deepest legacy came in the work of the Italian Ottorino Respighi. In the works of his so-called "Roman Trilogy" (not exactly a trilogy but a successful single work, Fontane di Roma, that generated two sequels), Respighi used huge orchestral canvases able to contain a variety of pictorial effects and references to styles ranging from that of Rimsky-Korsakov to Debussy (hear especially the first movement of Fontane di Roma) to Richard Strauss. Deepest credit here goes to sound engineer Ralph Couzens, working in the Church of S. Augustine, Kilbourn, London. Churches generally produce over-resonant recordings of symphonic repertory, but here, the manifold textures of Respighi's music, including such difficult-to-record combinations as high percussion over brass, all come through with startling clarity. Of course, conductor John Wilson and his Sinfonia of London contribute to this clarity with precisely crafted balances, all the more impressive in that the Sinfonia of London is a session orchestra that did not hone their performances of these works in concert. The Roman Trilogy pieces are four-movement symphonies in all but name, and Wilson adopts a strong, propulsive approach that holds the thematic development together and may remind listeners of the style of the early major champion of these works, Arturo Toscanini. These are exceptional Respighi recordings.”

Album review provided by TiVo. This content is not produced by Primephonic, and any views expressed are the review author’s own.

Record label

Credits

    Released

    31 July 2020

Done